Module title: Physics-Based Animation

SCQF level: 11:
SCQF credit value: 20.00
ECTS credit value: 10

Module code: SET11117
Module leader: Gregory Leplatre
School School of Computing
Subject area group: Software Engineering
Prerequisites

To study this module you will need to have sufficient programming experience and fundamental understanding of linear algebra and calculus. Some background in computer graphics is helpful.
Examples of Equivalent Learning An understanding of development/ software engineering to an advanced level as indicated by study at degree level.

2017/8, Trimester 1, Face-to-Face, Edinburgh Napier University
Occurrence: 001
Primary mode of delivery: Face-to-Face
Location of delivery: MERCHISTON
Partner: Edinburgh Napier University
Member of staff responsible for delivering module: Gregory Leplatre
Module Organiser:
Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Approach:
Learning & teaching methods including their alignment to LOs
Blended approach within lab-based practicals, tutorials and lectures. Lab work supported by VLE resources highlighting discussion and reflection points, with further directed study. Labs supported by case study work, with specific games implemented. Students are encouraged to collaborate during these sessions. Lectures are one hour, and will cover the design, development and technologies involved in physics-based development, linked to the individual technologies covered in the practical sessions. Lectures are supported by directed study and discussion points within Moodle. Guest lecturers from the research community and members of industry will also occur providing the students with insight into the workings of the game industry. The tutorials cover the fundamental mathematics and physics underpinning physics-based simulation programming.
The lab based practical sessions are aligned with LOs 1, 2 & 3. The practical sessions provide the necessary hands-on skills required for games development and in particular the focus shall be upon the development of a real world physics simulation prototype. These skills are demonstrated via the practical coursework.
The lectures are designed to align with LOs 1 & 2. The lectures provide a broad understanding of different technologies in physics, such as rigid bodies, particles and cloth effects
The tutorial sessions align with LO 4. The tutorials cover the fundamental mathematics required for physics-based development.


Student Activity (Notional Equivalent Study Hours (NESH))
Mode of activityLearning & Teaching ActivityNESH (Study Hours)
Face To Face Lecture 24
Face To Face Tutorial 9
Independent Learning Guided independent study 140
Face To Face Practical classes and workshops 24
Face To Face Centrally Time Tabled Examination 3
Total Study Hours200
Expected Total Study Hours for Module200
Assessment
Type of Assessment Weighting % LOs covered Week due Length in Hours/Words
Report 15 1,2 7 HOURS= 15, WORDS= 0
Project - Written 50 1,2,3,5 12 HOURS= 50, WORDS= 0
Class Test 10 4 5 HOURS= 1, WORDS= 0
Class Test 10 4 9 HOURS= 1, WORDS= 0
Class Test 10 2,4 13 HOURS= 1, WORDS= 0
Oral Presentation 5 1 4 HOURS= 0.1, WORDS= 0
Component 1 subtotal: 70
Component 2 subtotal: 30
Module subtotal: 100

Description of module content:

This module aims to provide students with a strong formal underpinning of physics-based animation techniques for usage in real world software development problems. Integrating recent research principles and practical techniques with existing software development skills, the student will learn to reason and develop physics-based effects in a correct and reliable fashion. The module itself is formed around physics-based technologies which can be integrated into real-time interactive environments, such as games. The formal model of component / object based techniques, with an underpinning in formal physics-based principles.

This module introduces students to computer animation and related simulation techniques, as applicable to computer games, virtual reality systems, and film special effects. Efficient numerical methods for simulating a variety of visually interesting physical phenomena will be discussed in the context of both interactive and offline simulation. Topics include deformable objects (i.e., solids and cloths), fluids, character rigging, quaternions, inverse kinematics, motion capture, sound simulation, collision detection, rigid body dynamics, and GPU programming.

The module covers the following topics:

Finite Element Methods
Finite Difference Methods
Collision Detection & Response
Stability and Implicit Integration
Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics
Model Reduction Techniques
Simulation Control
Particle Systems
Deformable Solids & Fracturing
Cloth, Thin Shells & Hair
Smoke & Explosions
Liquids
Rigid Body Mechanics

Learning Outcomes for module:

On completion of the module, students will be able to:
LO1: Demonstrate a working knowledge of physics-based programming methods.
LO2: Design and Implement a 3D application that utilises physics-based simulation concepts.
LO3: Critically analyse, develop, and debug a variety of physics-based systems.
LO4: Critically evaluate theoretical and conceptual ideas of physics-based techniques.
LO5: Present the results in an appropriate form and draw appropriate conclusions.

Indicative References and Reading List - URL:

Core - DAVID H. EBERLY. (2010) GAME PHYSICS: CRC PRESS., 2nd ed.
Core - IAN MILLINGTON (2010) GAME PHYSICS ENGINE DEVELOPMENT: CRC PRESS, 2nd ed.
Core - CHRISTER ERICSON (2004) REAL-TIME COLLISION DETECTION: CRC PRESS., 1st ed.
Core - DAVID BOURG (2013) PHYSICS FOR GAME DEVELOPERS: O’REILLY MEDIA, 3rd ed.
Core - ACM TRANSACTIONS ON GRAPHICS
Click here to view the LibrarySearch.