Module title: Feature Writing

SCQF level: 08:
SCQF credit value: 20.00
ECTS credit value: 10

Module code: JAC08102
Module leader: Eamonn O'Neill
School School of Arts and Creative Industries
Subject area group: Media and Screen
Prerequisites

no

2018/9, Trimester 1, Face-to-Face,
Occurrence: 004
Primary mode of delivery: Face-to-Face
Location of delivery: MERCHISTON
Partner:
Member of staff responsible for delivering module: Clare Trodden
Module Organiser:


Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Approach:
Learning & teaching methods including their alignment to Los
Three-hour workshops, delivered by an experienced feature writer will offer you intensive instruction and insights and also enable you to learn by doing. There will be a strong emphasis on independent study and you will be encouraged to develop your own feature ideas and produce a portfolio of publishable work (LO 3-4). You will also be given the opportunity to analyse the context in which features are produced and to comment on the quality of your own work in a reflection log. In this reflection log will pinpoint possible target publications for your work and outline how you would pitch your work to an employer (LO 1-2 and 5).

Embedding of employability/ PDP/ scholarship skills
Features account for an increasing proportion of print media content, so acquiring skills in this sphere boosts employability. Feature writing is also often a freelance activity so can form part of a portfolio career. Students will reflect on target publications and on ways to pitch freelance work. PDP will be enhanced through active self-evaluation and critical reflection.


Formative Assessment:
Assessment
The portfolio of features (LO 3-4) will amount to 80% of summative assessment weighting and will be completed throughout the module. You will be given the opportunity to practise pitching your work. You will also be encouraged to develop critical self-evaluation skills through the completion of a reflection log (20%) which will be submitted in week 13 on completion of the last of the aforementioned practical exercises (LO1-2 and 5).

Summative Assessment:
.

Student Activity (Notional Equivalent Study Hours (NESH))
Mode of activityLearning & Teaching ActivityNESH (Study Hours)
Face To Face Tutorial 24
Independent Learning Guided independent study 176
Total Study Hours200
Expected Total Study Hours for Module200


Assessment
Type of Assessment Weighting % LOs covered Week due Length in Hours/Words
Portfolio 80 3,4 1 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 1500
Learning Log 20 1,2,5 13 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 1000
Component 1 subtotal: 80
Component 2 subtotal: 20
Module subtotal: 100

Description of module content:

The module begins by examining the scope and scale of the ever-expanding marketplace for features, its rising potentialities and remaining constraints, emphasising its market-driven nature and the often strong influence of advertisers on which articles get commissioned and published. We shall look at what staff and freelance feature writers need to do to get their work in print by reflecting upon the principles, practices and processes operating in this sphere of journalism. Practical instruction will be offered in pitching and penning penetrating news features, backgrounders, human interest stories, profiles, reviews, fly-on-the-wall features, eyewitness accounts and columns.
Important points of structure and style will be flagged up throughout the practical exercises and you will be shown how to add colour and atmosphere to bring your writing to life. You will receive technical support in learning how to lay out features with appropriate software.

Learning Outcomes for module:

Upon completion of this module, you will be able to:
LO1: Demonstrate an understanding of the role of features within the media
LO2: Demonstrate an understand of the challenges facing feature writers
LO3: Generate and pitch strong, marketable feature ideas for specific target readerships
LO4: Produce and lay out a portfolio of feature articles that are written with flair and precision
LO5: Reflect critically on the quality of the work produced.

Indicative References and Reading List - URL:

Core - KEEBLE, R. (2014) THE NEWSPAPERS HANDBOOK: ROUTLEDGE, 5th ed.
Recommended - HICKS, W. (2008) WRITING FOR JOURNALISTS: ROUTLEDGE, 2nd ed.
Recommended - MCKAY, J. (2013) THE MAGAZINES HANDBOOK: ROUTLEDGE, 3rd ed.
Recommended - HENNESSY, B. (2013) WRITING FEATURE ARTICLES: FOCAL PRESS, 5th ed.
Recommended - PAPE, S. , FEATHERSTONE, S. (2006) FEATURE WRITING: A PRACTICAL INTRODUCTION: SAGE, 1st ed.
Recommended - EVANS, H. & CRAWFORD, G. (2000) ESSENTIAL ENGLISH FOR JOURNALISTS, EDITORS AND WRITERS: PIMLICO, 1st ed.
Recommended - PHILLIPS, A. (2007) GOOD WRITING FOR JOURNALISTS: SAGE, 1st ed.
Recommended - PHYTHIAN, B. A. (2010) TEACH YOURSELF CORRECT ENGLISH: HODDER AND STOUGHTON, 3rd ed.
Recommended - ZINSSER, W. (2001) ON WRITING WELL: THE CLASSIC GUIDE TO WRITING NON-FICTION: COLLINS, 1st ed.
Click here to view the LibrarySearch.