Module title: Understanding Language in the Global Workplace

SCQF level: 11:
SCQF credit value: 20.00
ECTS credit value: 10

Module code: LNG11118
Module leader: Nick Pilcher
School The Business School
Subject area group: Tourism and Languages
Prerequisites

There are no pre-requisites for this module to be added

2018/9, Trimester 1, Face-to-Face, Edinburgh Napier University
Occurrence: 001
Primary mode of delivery: Face-to-Face
Location of delivery: CRAIGLOCKHAR
Partner: Edinburgh Napier University
Member of staff responsible for delivering module: Nick Pilcher
Module Organiser:


Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Approach:
Learning & Teaching methods including their alignment to Los
This module consists of 3 hour seminars combining lecture and workshop. The first 45 minutes – 1 hour of each session (after session 1 which will consist of an hour long introduction + an hour lecture and a one hour workshop) consists of a lecture on the theme being studied. This will progress throughout the course of the module to cover: theories of language at a lexical level (2 sessions [LO1]); theories of language at a sentence level (1 session [LO1]); theories of language at an extended discourse level (2 sessions [LO1]); theories of the ethnography of communication (2 sessions [LO2]); theories of translation and interpretation (2 sessions [LO2]). The subsequent two hours of the session will consist of activities that apply the materials learnt in that session and in previous sessions as the module progresses [LO3,4]. These activities will be individual, pair, and group discussion and also incorporate role play, simulation, presentation and whole class discussion elements [LO3,4].

Embedding of employability/PDP/Scholarship Skills
Fuller understanding of the language will help give a much deeper understanding of the activities in the sessions designed in many times to be similar to professional situations (role play, simulation, group discussion). This will have a positive impact upon professional practice and effectiveness through raising awareness and knowledge of the impact of language, of what language can do, and to thereby help avoid misunderstandings and miscommunications in an international context.

Assessment (formative or summative)
Coursework assessment will be both formative and summative and will consist of two portfolios. These will be completed during the course of the module which will assess all learning outcomes (the first portfolio analyses of a written text, and the second portfolio analyses a spoken text). For the portfolio students will receive feedback on an initial draf

Formative Assessment:
The University is currently undertaking work to improve the quality of information provided on methods of assessment and feedback. Please refer to the section on Learning and Teaching Approaches above for further information about this module’s learning, teaching and assessment practices, including formative and summative approaches.

Summative Assessment:
The University is currently undertaking work to improve the quality of information provided on methods of assessment and feedback. Please refer to the section on Learning and Teaching Approaches above for further information about this module’s learning, teaching and assessment practices, including formative and summative approaches.

Student Activity (Notional Equivalent Study Hours (NESH))
Mode of activityLearning & Teaching ActivityNESH (Study Hours)
Face To Face Practical classes and workshops 36
Independent Learning Guided independent study 164
Total Study Hours200
Expected Total Study Hours for Module200


Assessment
Type of Assessment Weighting % LOs covered Week due Length in Hours/Words
Portfolio 25 1 - 4 8 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 1500
Portfolio 25 1 - 4 25 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 1500
Centrally Time Tabled Examination 50 1, 2, 3, 4 14/15 HOURS= 2, WORDS= 0
Component 1 subtotal: 50
Component 2 subtotal: 50
Module subtotal: 100

Description of module content:

The module content will provide you with an understanding of a number of theories of language, such as how language can affect thought (e.g. Sapir Whorff (see Hua 2004 (ed.)), representations of language, such as how it plays the role of a game (e.g. Saussure, Wittgenstein), the importance of dialogue and conversation in creating meanings (e.g. Bakhtin), different ‘formal levels’ of language used in different media and text types, or genres (e.g. Swales) and how to analyse writing and speaking, or discourse (e.g. Fairclough). The module content also considers the role of language in culture (e.g. Scollon and Scollon), different cultures (or ethnographies) of communication (e.g. Dell Hymes), and theories of translation (e.g. Werner and Campbell (see Cortazzi et al, 2011)) and interpreting (e.g. Vermeer (See Cortazzi et al, 2011)). One hour lectures will cover these areas.

Follow up two hour tutorials will discuss these aspects in how they apply to written and spoken texts taken from professional contexts. We will reflect on and critically evaluate how language is used, focusing on the impact and influence language has. Both the theory and practice will help you to be aware of the effect of language usage choices you hear and read, and also the language usage choices you make when you speak and write yourself. This will help you to be more effective in your professional career (Usunier, 2011).

Learning Outcomes for module:

LO1: To critically evaluate a range of theories of language at a lexical, sentence and extended discourse level.
LO2: To assess and apply theories of the ethnography of communication, translation and interpretation.
LO3: To assess and apply a range of theories of language to the use of language in a range of professional contexts
LO4: To critically reflect upon and evaluate the effect and meaning of the use of language in a range of professional contexts.

Indicative References and Reading List - URL:

Core - USUNIER, J.-C. JOURNAL OF WORLD BUSINESS (2011) : N.A. Vol. 46, 3rd ed.
Core - BARGIELA-CHIAPPINI, F., & NICKERSON, C.R. (1999) WRITING BUSINESS: GENRES, MEDIA, AND DISCOURSES.: LONGMAN, 1st ed.
Core - HUA, Z (2011) THE LANGUAGE AND INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION READER.: ROUTLEDGE, 1st ed.
Recommended - BAKHTIN, M.M. (1982) THE DIALOGIC IMAGINATION: UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, 1st ed.
Recommended - CORTAZZI, M., PILCHER, N., & JIN, L QUALITATIVE RESEARCH (2011) : SAGE Vol. 11, 5th ed.
Recommended - FAIRCLOUGH, N CRITICAL DISCOURSE ANALYSIS: THE CRITICAL STUDY OF LANGUAGE.: LONGMAN, 1st ed.
Recommended - SAUSSURE, F. COURSE IN GENERAL LINGUISTICS: PHILOSOPHICAL LIBRARY, 1st ed.
Recommended - WITTGENSTEIN, L. (1953) PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS.: BLACKWELL, 1st ed.
Recommended - SCOLLON, R., & SCOLLON, S. B. K. (1995) INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION: A DISCOURSE APPROACH.: BLACKWELL, 1st ed.
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