Module title: Forensic Materials Engineering

SCQF level: 11:
SCQF credit value: 20.00
ECTS credit value: 10

Module code: MEC11112
Module leader: Neil Shearer
School School of Engineering and the Built Environment
Subject area group: Mechanical Materials and Manufacturing Management
Prerequisites

There are no pre-requisites for this module to be added

2019/0, Trimester 2, Face-to-Face, Edinburgh Napier University
Occurrence: 001
Primary mode of delivery: Face-to-Face
Location of delivery: MERCHISTON
Partner: Edinburgh Napier University
Member of staff responsible for delivering module: Neil Shearer
Module Organiser:


Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Approach:
Learning & teaching methods
The objective is to build the learner’s knowledge, understanding and problem solving skills in the methods and techniques associated with forensic materials engineering. This will be achieved through a combination of lectures & case studies. Practical work on product /failure analysis will form a major part of the module. (LO1- LO4)
Lectures, supported by notes will introduce concepts and provide a framework of self-study. Tutorials will allow students to explore some of the lecture topics in more detail.

Embedding of employability skills
The module will require students to develop practical materials characterisation skills and significant problem solving abilities. Regular discussions and reporting, will necessitate a high level of proficiency in communication skills. These activities will enhance the employability of students undertaking this module. (LO1-4)

Assessment
The module will be assessed by coursework (LO1-4) on an extended product analysis or failure investigation and a final written examination. (LO1-4)

Research/ teaching linkages
Staff undertakes current research as well as 'real' materials/component problems received in the Advanced Materials Centre. Relevant research findings are delivered within the module.

Supporting equality and diversity
All materials are provided via the VLE to cater for the diverse student cohort & provide a framework for self-study. Academic supervision and tutorial support are available each week of the module to support students in any capacity.

Internationalisation
Case studies into failure & materials characterisation will be taken from around the world. Key information from worldwide standards, specifications or relevant technical literature will also be extracted to support the module. Traditionally the programme has students from around the world. Discussions of their experiences in their own countries will help to achieve the internationalisation aims of the module.

Formative Assessment:
The University is currently undertaking work to improve the quality of information provided on methods of assessment and feedback. Please refer to the section on Learning and Teaching Approaches above for further information about this module’s learning, teaching and assessment practices, including formative and summative approaches.

Summative Assessment:
The University is currently undertaking work to improve the quality of information provided on methods of assessment and feedback. Please refer to the section on Learning and Teaching Approaches above for further information about this module’s learning, teaching and assessment practices, including formative and summative approaches.

Student Activity (Notional Equivalent Study Hours (NESH))
Mode of activityLearning & Teaching ActivityNESH (Study Hours)
Face To Face Practical classes and workshops 39
Independent Learning Guided independent study 132
Face To Face Lecture 26
Face To Face Centrally Time Tabled Examination 3
Total Study Hours200
Expected Total Study Hours for Module200


Assessment
Type of Assessment Weighting % LOs covered Week due Length in Hours/Words
Report 10 1 6 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 1000
Report 10 4 11 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 500
Centrally Time Tabled Examination 60 1,2,3 14/15 HOURS= 3, WORDS= 0
Report 20 4 13 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 1500
Component 1 subtotal: 40
Component 2 subtotal: 60
Module subtotal: 100

Description of module content:

Forensic materials engineering methods including macroscopic inspection, microscopic examination, chemical analysis and mechanical testing. Specifically this will cover:
Mechanical testing: stress-strain, creep, fatigue, impact, hardness, fracture toughness, abrasion, friction, tear, compression.
Thermal testing: Tg, Tm, flame testing, thermal analysis.
Optical and Electron Microscopy: lighting variations, scanning/transmission electron microscopy, preparation of specimens.
Detection and Identification: EDXA, chromatography, X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption, mass and emission spectrography.
Optical testing: colour, haze, gloss, birefringence.
Non-Destructive Testing: X-radiography, []-radiography, ultrasonic testing, dye-penetrant, magnetic particle inspection.
Processability testing: viscosity, cure shrinkage, orientation.
Test procedures: standards, need for testing
Environmental testing: chemical resistance, stress cracking, ageing, accelerated corrosion.
Fire performance testing: ignitability, spread of flame, smoke, toxic gases, LOI.
Solderability testing: solder balance, microscopic evaluation.
In addition to the above, the failure of products and processes will be considered together with case studies of major disasters where materials failures were considered significant contributors.



Learning Outcomes for module:

On completion of this module you will be able to:
LO1: critically assess, select and apply a range of physical, analytical and mechanical examination techniques used in materials technology and product failure analysis.
LO2: apply appropriate forensic techniques to analyse and report on the cause of failures in products.
LO3: select and apply appropriate investigative techniques to determine the quality of components and investigate product defects
LO4: conduct a product/failure analysis using forensic methods and report, orally and in written work, the outcomes of the investigation.

Indicative References and Reading List - URL:
Forensic Materials Engineering