Module title: Palliative Care Theory for Practice

SCQF level: 09:
SCQF credit value: 20.00
ECTS credit value: 10

Module code: NMS09142
Module leader: Isabel Dosser
School School of Health & Social Care
Subject area group: Enduring Conditions and Community Care
Prerequisites

n/a

2018/9, Trimester 2, Blended, Edinburgh Napier University
Occurrence: 001
Primary mode of delivery: Blended
Location of delivery: SIGHTHILL
Partner: Edinburgh Napier University
Member of staff responsible for delivering module: Isabel Dosser
Module Organiser:


Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Approach:
This module uses a blended learning approach via Moodle, the University preferred virtual learning environment, and face to face tutorials. Also used are new technologies such as online discussions, Textwall, audio and video files via links (LOs 1, 2, 6). Textwall specifically used in a week six evaluation, empowers the students to offer their thoughts on the module to date. This has in the past contributed to alterations in class delivery over the final six weeks The Moodle units which provide the theoretical content and structured learning activities including self-assessment, are presented sequentially to guide the student through the module (LOs 1-6). Online activities including formative discussions facilitate active learner engagement with content including critical reflection. Collaborative learning is promoted through asynchronous discussions online with peers and lecturers including topics such as the philosophy, political context, end of life pathway and carer support (LOs 1, 5, 6). The use of Moodle in this module offers the student flexibility to undertake learning at a time suited to the students’ lifestyle. The face to face sessions on alternative weeks of the module, build on the theoretical content by using facilitative teaching methods where application of clinical knowledge and experience are explored (LOs 1-6). The use of interactive teaching methods and experiential role play allows the student to actively engage with realistic patient and family case scenarios which they can relate to practice (LOs 2, 4, 6). The module encourages a range of healthcare professionals who can register for the module within the BSc programme. This interdisciplinary working mimics palliative care philosophy.

For the purposes of University Academic Regulations this module is a School of Health & Social Care theory module in line with regulation B.8.5.2 and B8.5.10.

Formative Assessment:
The student will be permitted to submit an essay plan and invited to attend group supervision in relation to the expectations of the summative essay.

Summative Assessment:
The student’s knowledge will be assessed in a summative manner by producing an essay (4000 words). This assessment will measure the understanding of the student in regard to the principles of palliative care and how it is delivered across healthcare currently. This will be submitted in week 14.

Student Activity (Notional Equivalent Study Hours (NESH))
Mode of activityLearning & Teaching ActivityNESH (Study Hours)
Online Guided independent study 60
Face To Face Tutorial 27
Independent Learning Guided independent study 113
Total Study Hours200
Expected Total Study Hours for Module200


Assessment
Type of Assessment Weighting % LOs covered Week due Length in Hours/Words
Essay 100 1-6 14 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 4000
Component 1 subtotal: 100
Component 2 subtotal: 0
Module subtotal: 100
2018/9, Trimester 2, Blended, Edinburgh Napier University
Occurrence: 003
Primary mode of delivery: Blended
Location of delivery: SIGHTHILL
Partner: Edinburgh Napier University
Member of staff responsible for delivering module: Isabel Dosser
Module Organiser:


Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Approach:
This module uses a blended learning approach via Moodle, the University preferred virtual learning environment, and face to face tutorials. Also used are new technologies such as online discussions, Textwall, audio and video files via links (LOs 1, 2, 6). Textwall specifically used in a week six evaluation, empowers the students to offer their thoughts on the module to date. This has in the past contributed to alterations in class delivery over the final six weeks The Moodle units which provide the theoretical content and structured learning activities including self-assessment, are presented sequentially to guide the student through the module (LOs 1-6). Online activities including formative discussions facilitate active learner engagement with content including critical reflection. Collaborative learning is promoted through asynchronous discussions online with peers and lecturers including topics such as the philosophy, political context, end of life pathway and carer support (LOs 1, 5, 6). The use of Moodle in this module offers the student flexibility to undertake learning at a time suited to the students’ lifestyle. The face to face sessions on alternative weeks of the module, build on the theoretical content by using facilitative teaching methods where application of clinical knowledge and experience are explored (LOs 1-6). The use of interactive teaching methods and experiential role play allows the student to actively engage with realistic patient and family case scenarios which they can relate to practice (LOs 2, 4, 6). The module encourages a range of healthcare professionals who can register for the module within the BSc programme. This interdisciplinary working mimics palliative care philosophy.

For the purposes of University Academic Regulations this module is a School of Health & Social Care theory module in line with regulation B.8.5.2 and B8.5.10.

Formative Assessment:
The student will be permitted to submit an essay plan and invited to attend group supervision in relation to the expectations of the summative essay.

Summative Assessment:
The student’s knowledge will be assessed in a summative manner by producing an essay (4000 words). This assessment will measure the understanding of the student in regard to the principles of palliative care and how it is delivered across healthcare currently. This will be submitted in week 14.

Student Activity (Notional Equivalent Study Hours (NESH))
Mode of activityLearning & Teaching ActivityNESH (Study Hours)
Online Guided independent study 60
Face To Face Tutorial 27
Independent Learning Guided independent study 113
Total Study Hours200
Expected Total Study Hours for Module200


Assessment
Type of Assessment Weighting % LOs covered Week due Length in Hours/Words
Essay 100 1-6 14 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 4000
Component 1 subtotal: 100
Component 2 subtotal: 0
Module subtotal: 100

Description of module content:

In this module you will have the opportunity to explore how a palliative approach can improve end of life with the focus on quality of life and a dignified death for patients across all healthcare settings. You will also be introduced to the World Health Organisation (WHO) (2004) principles of palliative care and critically consider how these relate to holistic and compassionate care of people with a variety of life limiting illnesses, and their families.

As well as an introduction to the WHO principles of palliative care; you will also be introduced to local, national and international policy perspectives and strategies with a focus on national priorities. Discussion and exploration of an interdisciplinary approach to palliative care including comparison of generalist and specialist care; strategies to inform patient and carer assessment; communication and difficult conversations; end of life pathways and advanced care planning; evidence based symptom assessment and management; ethical and cultural issues; palliative care emergencies; how to support patients and carers experiencing loss and bereavement.

Learning Outcomes for module:

Upon completion of this module you will be able to
LO1: Demonstrate an understanding and integrated knowledge of the principles of palliative care
LO2: Evaluate and use a range of skills in communication in patient/carer assessment within palliative care
LO3: Review and critically analyse evidence based interventions to minimise physical, psychological, social and spiritual impact of a life limiting illness
LO4: Evaluate the contribution and challenges of promoting and working within an interdisciplinary team in palliative care.
LO5: Reflect and interpret ethical and cultural issues that may arise in palliative care situations
LO6: Based on the best evidence raise awareness and appreciation of loss and bereavement within a palliative care context

Indicative References and Reading List - URL:

Core - DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (2008) END OF LIFE STRATEGY; PROMOTING HIGH QUALITY CARE FOR ALL ADULTS AT THE END OF LIFE LONDON DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH - WWW.GOV.UK/GOVERNMENT/ORGANISATIONS/DEPARTMENT-OF-HEALTH
Core - SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT (2008)LIVING AND DYING WELL: A NATIONAL ACTION PLAN FOR PALLIATIVE AND END OF LIFE CARE IN SCOTLAND EDINBURGH SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT - WWW.GOV.SCOT
Recommended - FERRELL BR COYLE N (2010) (2015) OXFORD TEXTBOOK OF PALLIATIVE NURSING (2015): OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS Vol. 1, 4th ed. - ISBN: 1397801993
Recommended - HANKS G CHERNY NA FALLON M KAASA S PORTENOV RK (EDITORS) (2011) OXFORD TEXTBOOK OF PALLIATIVE MEDICINE: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS Vol. 1, 4th ed. - ISBN: 1397801996
Recommended - WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (2004) - WWW.WHO.INT/EN/
Recommended - PAYNE S SEYMOUR J INGLETON C (2008) (2008) PALLIATIVE CARE NURSING: PRINCIPLES AND EVIDENCE FOR PRACTICE LONDON: OPEN UNIVERSITY PRESS Vol. 2, 2nd ed. - ISBN: 9780335221813
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