Module title: Population Health for Practice

SCQF level: 11:
SCQF credit value: 20.00
ECTS credit value: 10

Module code: NMS11186
Module leader: Iain Atherton
School School of Health & Social Care
Subject area group: Population and Public Health
Prerequisites

n/a

2019/0, Trimester 2, Online,
Occurrence: 001
Primary mode of delivery: Online
Location of delivery: SIGHTHILL
Partner:
Member of staff responsible for delivering module: Iain Atherton
Module Organiser:


Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Approach:
This module will be entirely online. Moodle will enable a very clear structure to the module and facilitate students progressing with focus on substantive material.

Learning will principally use a ‘flipped classroom’, an approach to teaching population health that has been demonstrably effective elsewhere (Simpson and Richards, 2015). Lectures will be replaced by 10 hours worth of short screencasts. These screencasts will each focus on a topic, and will draw on researcher in population health as well as practice. Indeed a particular strength of the module will be that it will draw on the work of the Nurses’ Lives Programme, which is currently developing evidence about the health of nurses using routinely collected data. Students will be encouraged to complete formative work, and then to participate in interactive hour long seminars associated with screencasts and reading will then encourage and enable students to discuss and reflect on learning, identifying areas they do not understand or with which they disagree, as well as reflections on applicability to their own practice. Numbers of students on each online seminar will be kept small to enable engagement by participants, if necessary running each several times.

In summary, module participation will in each week consist of:
(1) Watching an hour of screencasts;
(2) Reading associated papers and book chapters;
(3) Completing a formative exercise (not mandatory or marked)
(4) Participation in a one hour online seminar.

The module will be divided into six discrete units that will develop students’ abilities to think about why population health matters (LO1), evidence for population health (LO2), current issues in population health (LO3), population health interventions (LO4), potential responses by practitioners (LO5), and how learning from across the module can inform their own practice (LO6).



Formative Assessment:
Assessment will be based on the principles of a patchwork assessment, short formative assessment developing critical abilities and communication strategies towards a final summative assessment that clearly links ideas back to practice (see Boud and Falchikov, 2005). The aim is to utilise assessment as a means to developing skills useful to students in their future careers with projects that have direct relevance to practice.

Formative assessments will be developed for submission prior to online seminars. This formative work will be designed to facilitate engagement, encouraging students to watch screencasts and read associated papers and book chapters, and to encourage reflection prior to participating in online seminars. These assessments will be based on short reflective pieces, providing students with a basis for discussion in seminars, encouraging reflection, and the development of student led support. They will not be marked, students being encouraged to self-assess, and to discuss with the teaching team where they themselves consider appropriate.


Summative Assessment:
The summative assessment will be based on the style of a BMJ editorial: 1,000 words maximum with no more than 12 references allowed. Students will be asked to make a case for a population health intervention in their own field of practice. Writing concisely and persuasively is an essential skill, whether engaging in policy discussions, writing a research proposal, or discussing cases in practice. The editorial will give students the scope to demonstrate their ability to synthesise evidence identifying key evidence, and to use that information to make a balanced argument. It will also encourage students to actively engage with population health in their own work, directly linking to the issues of CPD touched on in the previous section.

Student Activity (Notional Equivalent Study Hours (NESH))
Mode of activityLearning & Teaching ActivityNESH (Study Hours)
Online Tutorial 20
Independent Learning Guided independent study 180
Total Study Hours200
Expected Total Study Hours for Module200


Assessment
Type of Assessment Weighting % LOs covered Week due Length in Hours/Words
Report 100 1,2,3,4,5 & 6 15 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 1000
Component 1 subtotal: 100
Component 2 subtotal: 0
Module subtotal: 100
2019/0, Trimester 2, Online,
Occurrence: 002
Primary mode of delivery: Online
Location of delivery: SIGHTHILL
Partner:
Member of staff responsible for delivering module: Iain Atherton
Module Organiser:


Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Approach:
This module will be entirely online. Moodle will enable a very clear structure to the module and facilitate students progressing with focus on substantive material.

Learning will principally use a ‘flipped classroom’, an approach to teaching population health that has been demonstrably effective elsewhere (Simpson and Richards, 2015). Lectures will be replaced by 10 hours worth of short screencasts. These screencasts will each focus on a topic, and will draw on researcher in population health as well as practice. Indeed a particular strength of the module will be that it will draw on the work of the Nurses’ Lives Programme, which is currently developing evidence about the health of nurses using routinely collected data. Students will be encouraged to complete formative work, and then to participate in interactive hour long seminars associated with screencasts and reading will then encourage and enable students to discuss and reflect on learning, identifying areas they do not understand or with which they disagree, as well as reflections on applicability to their own practice. Numbers of students on each online seminar will be kept small to enable engagement by participants, if necessary running each several times.

In summary, module participation will in each week consist of:
(1) Watching an hour of screencasts;
(2) Reading associated papers and book chapters;
(3) Completing a formative exercise (not mandatory or marked)
(4) Participation in a one hour online seminar.

The module will be divided into six discrete units that will develop students’ abilities to think about why population health matters (LO1), evidence for population health (LO2), current issues in population health (LO3), population health interventions (LO4), potential responses by practitioners (LO5), and how learning from across the module can inform their own practice (LO6).


Formative Assessment:
Assessment will be based on the principles of a patchwork assessment, short formative assessment developing critical abilities and communication strategies towards a final summative assessment that clearly links ideas back to practice (see Boud and Falchikov, 2005). The aim is to utilise assessment as a means to developing skills useful to students in their future careers with projects that have direct relevance to practice.

Formative assessments will be developed for submission prior to online seminars. This formative work will be designed to facilitate engagement, encouraging students to watch screencasts and read associated papers and book chapters, and to encourage reflection prior to participating in online seminars. These assessments will be based on short reflective pieces, providing students with a basis for discussion in seminars, encouraging reflection, and the development of student led support. They will not be marked, students being encouraged to self-assess, and to discuss with the teaching team where they themselves consider appropriate.


Summative Assessment:
The summative assessment will be based on the style of a BMJ editorial: 1,000 words maximum with no more than 12 references allowed. Students will be asked to make a case for a population health intervention in their own field of practice. Writing concisely and persuasively is an essential skill, whether engaging in policy discussions, writing a research proposal, or discussing cases in practice. The editorial will give students the scope to demonstrate their ability to synthesise evidence identifying key evidence, and to use that information to make a balanced argument. It will also encourage students to actively engage with population health in their own work, directly linking to the issues of CPD touched on in the previous section.

Student Activity (Notional Equivalent Study Hours (NESH))
Mode of activityLearning & Teaching ActivityNESH (Study Hours)
Online Tutorial 20
Independent Learning Guided independent study 180
Total Study Hours200
Expected Total Study Hours for Module200


Assessment
Type of Assessment Weighting % LOs covered Week due Length in Hours/Words
Report 100 1,2,3,4,5 & 6 15 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 1000
Component 1 subtotal: 100
Component 2 subtotal: 0
Module subtotal: 100

Description of module content:

The module will provide the following:
- Discussion of research methods used in epidemiology
- Critical reflection on the philosophical basis for population health in the context of social care
- Critical discussion of major theoretical ideas influential in contemporary population studies in light of recent evidence and their implications for health and social care
- Consider strategies for improving population health and their implications for health and social care
- Exploration of practical implications of population health for practitioners in today’s health and social care environment

Health care practitioners have an invaluable role in helping to address pressing population health issues. This module provides an accessible introduction to the subject, providing grounding in its research methods, theories, and discussion of the most pressing concerns. Students will be introduced to the theory and methods of epidemiology, and will be encouraged to reflect on relevance of population health to clinical practice.

Learning Outcomes for module:

LO1: Critically consider the rationale for population health in day-to-day health and social care.
LO2: Development of a critical understanding of how different epidemiological designs can provide insights into population health.
LO3: Analytically reflect on theoretical issues in population health.
LO4: Critically discuss different approaches to addressing health and social care issues at the level of populations.
LO5: Reflect on how population health can inform health and social care practitioners at the individual level.
LO6: Critically reflect on Learning Outcomes 1-6 to develop a reasoned case for change in health care practice in light of a pressing population health concern.

Indicative References and Reading List - URL:

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