Module title: Practical Forensic Psychology

SCQF level: 11:
SCQF credit value: 20.00
ECTS credit value: 10

Module code: PSY11100
Module leader: Marc Kozlowski
School School of Applied Sciences
Subject area group: Psychology
Prerequisites

n/a

2019/0, Trimester 1, FACE-TO-FACE, Edinburgh Napier University
Occurrence: 001
Primary mode of delivery: FACE-TO-FACE
Location of delivery: SIGHTHILL
Partner: Edinburgh Napier University
Member of staff responsible for delivering module: Marc Kozlowski
Module Organiser:


Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Approach:
Workstream 1 of the module is delivered via five lectures, and one practical session. This will provide students with the opportunity to develop new practical skills, including: developing a formulation of risk for a fictitious offender; reflecting on the Scottish Criminal Justice system’s approaches to managing the risk posed by offenders; and critically appraising a risk formulation in a multi-disciplinary setting. (LOs1-3)

Workstream 2 of the module is delivered via mainly practical, task-based and group discussion based classes. A small number of lectures will also be delivered to provide contextualisation for the practical tasks. This will provide students with the opportunity to develop new practical skills, including: interviewing ‘witnesses’; and constructing a facial composite. Via post-activity class discussion the students will evaluate current research and practice in light of relevant psychological theories. (LOs4-6)

Students will receive in-class feedback during discussions in Workstream 1 and on practical exercises in Workstream 2; particularly focusing on their practical application of theory and on the actual in-class use of the skills which they are learning during the practical sessions. The use of discussion forums on Moodle will also be employed to allow peer to peer discussion between class time.




Formative Assessment:
In Workstream 1, students will receive formative assessment of a 1200-word written risk formulation which they will submit after Week 4’s lecture. The formulation will follow current professional guidelines. They will receive their feedback before Week 6. This will relate to LO1.


Summative Assessment:
In Workstream 1, students will receive summative assessment of a 1,200 word risk formulation of a fictitious offender's case, relating to LO1. Students will also receive an 800-word reflective practice diary entry which they will submit after Week 5’s lecture. This will relate to LO2. They will receive their feedback prior to Week 7. They will also receive summative assessment of an orally-delivered critical appraisal of a risk formulation, which will form the practical exercise in Week 7. They will receive their feedback prior to Week 8. This will relate to LO3.

In Workstream 2 students will complete a written assessment of 2000 words. This requires critical analysis of one of the three practical sessions from this Workstream. For this assessment students are required to evaluate the contribution of cognitive psychology to the topic/technique they have selected, reflect on their experience of the technique during the practical class, and consider the implications for professional practice. This assesses LOs 4-6.




Student Activity (Notional Equivalent Study Hours (NESH))
Mode of activityLearning & Teaching ActivityNESH (Study Hours)
Face To Face Groupwork (Scheduled) 25
Independent Learning Guided independent study 175
Total Study Hours200
Expected Total Study Hours for Module200


Assessment
Type of Assessment Weighting % LOs covered Week due Length in Hours/Words
Oral Assessment 50 1,2,3 9 HOURS= 0.15, WORDS= 0
Learning Log 50 4,5,6 13 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 2000
Component 1 subtotal: 100
Component 2 subtotal: 0
Module subtotal: 100

Description of module content:

This module comprises two work streams.
Work stream 1: Risk in Forensic Populations
Risk in Forensic Populations will explore the biological, social, and psychological risk factors that contribute, both individually and through interacting with one another, to risk of violence and other anti-social behaviours. You will learn about the Structured Professional Judgement (SPJ) approach to risk assessment, including the application of at least one SPJ risk assessment tool to a sample forensic case. You will develop the skills to construct, orally present, and be questioned in a mock multi-disciplinary risk management setting about, a formulation of a sample forensic case. A guest lecturer, who is an expert practitioner in their field, will present a critical evaluation of how risk is assessed and managed in serious offenders in Scotland. You will learn how to think and speak reflectively about your practice, and you will write a reflective diary entry relating to risk assessment and to risk management strategies in Scotland.

Work stream 2: Witnesses
Witnesses will explore three investigative applications that are employed to obtain information from eyewitnesses: investigative interviewing, facial composite production, and eyewitness memory and identification from CCTV footage. In each practical session you will develop a critical understanding of the psychological theories that underpin prescribed interviewing and identification practice. You will expand on this knowledge to explore and evaluate current trends in forensic research. In addition to your practical classes, you will engage with forensic policy and practice via three guest lectures delivered by professional forensic practitioners.

Learning Outcomes for module:

LO1: Develop a formulation of risk for a fictitious offender.
LO2: Reflect on the Scottish Criminal Justice system’s approaches to managing the risk posed by offenders.
LO3: Critically appraise a risk formulation in a multi-disciplinary setting.
LO4: Critically evaluate contemporary techniques for gathering information from witnesses, in light of the psychological literature.
LO5: Critically reflect on your personal experience of contemporary techniques and consider implications for practice.
LO6: Evaluate the contribution of cognitive psychology to the development of techniques used in current practice.

Indicative References and Reading List - URL:

Core - FROWD, C.D., BRUCE, V., SMITH, A., & HANCOCK, P.J.B. IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF FACIAL COMPOSITES USING A HOLISTIC COGNITIVE INTERVIEW (2008) : JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: APPLIED Vol. 14, 1st ed.
Core - FROWD, C.D., SKELTON F., HEPTON, G., HOLDEN, L., MINAHIL, S., ET AL. WHOLE-FACE PROCEDURES FOR RECOVERING FACIAL IMAGES FROM MEMORY (2013) : SCIENCE & JUSTICE Vol. 53, 1st ed.
Core - KOEHLER, J. A., LOSEL, F., AKOENSKI, T. D., & HUMPHREYS, D. K. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS ON THE EFFECTS OF YOUNG OFFENDER TREATMENT PROGRAMS IN EUROPE. (2013) : JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL CRIMINOLOGY Vol. 9, 1st ed.
Core - LOGAN, C., & JOHNSTONE, L. (2013) MANAGING CLINICAL RISK: A GUIDE TO EFFECTIVE PRACTICE: ROUTLEDGE, 1st ed.
Core - WELLS, G. L. EYEWITNESS IDENTIFICATION: PROBATIVE VALUE, CRITERION SHIFTS, AND POLICY (2014) : CURRENT DIRECTIONS IN PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE Vol. 23, 1st ed.
Recommended - DHAMI, M. K., SCHLOTTMANN, A., & WALDMANN, M. (2011) JUDGMENT AND DECISION MAKING AS A SKILL: LEARNING, DEVELOPMENT, AND EVOLUTION: CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 1st ed.
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