Core Module Information
Module title: From Script to Screen

SCQF level: 11:
SCQF credit value: 20.00
ECTS credit value: 10

Module code: SCA11104
Module leader: James Mavor
School School of Arts and Creative Industries
Subject area group: Screen and Performance
Prerequisites

no

Description of module content:

In this module you will look at storytelling and screenwriting for film and television in various contexts - historical, social, cultural, scholarly and theoretical.

You will develop the skills to examine the practices and products of screenwriting from a critical perspective and to use this to inform your own work and practice.

The module is delivered as a mixture of lectures, seminars and screenings from Screen Academy staff and guest lecturers.

The module is broadly divided into two parts, each of which leads a written assessment:

The first focuses on considerations of genre. Student presentations will be used as the basis for seminar discussion. Students will consider genre from various perspectives – academic, commercial and (as screenwriters) practical. Students will produce a written essay on an aspect of genre that interests them.

The second part of the module focuses on screenwriting craft, technique and theory. The influence of screenwriting theorists (e.g. Robert McKee) will be considered and debated as will the work of individual screenwriters (e.g. William Goldman, Josh Weedon).

Technical aspects of screenwriting craft will also be studied with illustrative examples from screenings, handouts etcetera. Students will produce a case study at the end of the module focussing on either the work of a particular screenwriter OR screenwriting theorist OR the application of a particular screenwriting technique OR a critical study of a particular adaptation.

Learning Outcomes for module:

Upon completion of this module, you will be able to:
LO1: Critically evaluate the idea of genre and its use as a tool for screenwriters
LO2: Critically analyze and discuss a range of key screenwriting texts and theories
LO3: Study a range of screenwriters and screenwriting strategies, including adaptation
LO4: Consider and critically evaluate a wide range of screenwriting texts in a range of local, national and international contexts.

Full Details of Teaching and Assessment
2022/3, Trimester 2, Face-to-Face, Edinburgh Napier University
VIEW FULL DETAILS
Occurrence: 001
Primary mode of delivery: Face-to-Face
Location of delivery: MERCHISTON
Partner: Edinburgh Napier University
Member of staff responsible for delivering module: James Mavor
Module Organiser:


Learning, Teaching and Assessment (LTA) Approach:
This module aims to develop student’s intellectual skills and to provide screenwriters with a contextual and theoretical foundation for their own future creative work. This module uses lectures, screenings and seminars together with independent study and formal essays to provide a variety of independent and group learning opportunities. Weekly classes use selected screenings stimulate discussion and debate around critical issues in a variety of screen works with a particular reference to the role of the screenwriter. (LO’s 1-4)

Films and television drama are analysed and discussed in their historical, cultural, economic and aesthetic contexts. (LO 4) The role of the screenwriter is also subject to critical scrutiny, considering issues such as authorship, originality, authenticity and craftsmanship. Core concerns are to improve students’ analytical skills and their intellectual capacities to challenge conventional approaches to film and television production. (LO’s 1, 2 and 4)

Students develop their historical and theoretical knowledge of film and television, as well as their critical capacities, and apply these in preparation of their two written assessments. Summative assessment s will be evaluated on the quality of critical abilities, research, argument, academic referencing and presentation skills. Participation in class is encouraged but not formally assessed. (LO’s 1-4)

The first assessment is an academic essay worth 40% of the module mark. Here, students are asked to engage critically with certain theoretical concepts (e.g. genre). The second assessment is a case study. Here, students are encouraged to explore the work of a particular screenwriter or a particular screenwriting tool (e.g. Voice Over) in some depth.

In both cases, the intention is that students use these assessments and the research and thinking involved as conceptual ground work for their own scripts in the Major Project module.

Formative Assessment:
The University is currently undertaking work to improve the quality of information provided on methods of assessment and feedback. Please refer to the section on Learning and Teaching Approaches above for further information about this module’s learning, teaching and assessment practices, including formative and summative approaches.

Summative Assessment:
The University is currently undertaking work to improve the quality of information provided on methods of assessment and feedback. Please refer to the section on Learning and Teaching Approaches above for further information about this module’s learning, teaching and assessment practices, including formative and summative approaches.

Student Activity (Notional Equivalent Study Hours (NESH))
Mode of activityLearning & Teaching ActivityNESH (Study Hours)
Face To Face Lecture 12
Face To Face Project Supervision 24
Independent Learning Guided independent study 164
Total Study Hours200
Expected Total Study Hours for Module200


Assessment
Type of Assessment Weighting % LOs covered Week due Length in Hours/Words
Essay 40 1, 2 7 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 2000
Essay 60 1-4 13 HOURS= 0, WORDS= 3000
Component 1 subtotal: 40
Component 2 subtotal: 60
Module subtotal: 100

Indicative References and Reading List - URL:
SCA11104 Script to Screen